Ryton Park Primary School (Page 1)

"Mining" the memories of their fathers and grandfathers who worked at the local pits of Shireoaks, Manton, Steetley and Firbeck

By Ann Donlan

The Mining Memories Roadshow revisited Ryton Park Primary School, Worksop on the 18th June 2013

 

Photo: Illustrative image for the 'Ryton Park Primary School        (Page 1)' page
Members of the Notts NUM Ex and Retired Miners Association returned to Ryton Park School, with their Mining Memories Roadshow.

The children got "hands on" with the mining artefacts

Photo: Illustrative image for the 'Ryton Park Primary School        (Page 1)' page

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photo:A "miner's life"!

A "miner's life"!

 and explored a temporary 'coal face'.

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

Photo: Illustrative image for the 'Ryton Park Primary School        (Page 1)' page
Former Shireoaks and Steetley Colliery Miner, Phil Whitehead, talked to the children about the recent mining history of the local Manton, Shireoaks, Steetley and Firbeck pits.

 

 

Phil told the children that, "Shireoaks Colliery was Worksop’s first coal mine." Correctly described as  “a pioneering enterprise”.

Photo:Shireoaks Colliery c 1900

Shireoaks Colliery c 1900

When the Top Hard seam was finally reached,

"two carts ceremoniously carried the first coal raised through Worksop and onto Clumber Park. Their progress was watched by large crowds of people and marked by the ringing of church bells."

 

About Steetley Colliery, Phil said:

Steetley was a unique, single shaft mine.  It ran on a shoestring, yet generated handsome profits year after year.  It also had a family atmosphere - something that time and again, its workers reminisce about.

Photo:Steetley Colliery

Steetley Colliery

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photo:Manton Colliery

Manton Colliery

Talking about Manton Pit,  Phil told the children that the pit village was built in the 1920s for the families of miners who came from many parts of the country to find a job.

Many men came from Wigan  there was no public transport so most of the men had to walk over the Pennines with open backed wagons with all their possessions tied on.

As more houses were built, more families came from Durham, Lancashire, Wales and Yorkshire. All the different dialects meant people could not understand each other. To make it worse, the Lancashire folk wore clogs. These made lots of noise in the streets.

This page was added on 04/07/2013.
Comments about this page

If it is of interest to anyone I have in my possession price lists for Manton & firbeck Collieries. Manton list is dated 1910 I think and Firbeck is c1935

By Geoff Thompson
On 15/01/2015

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